Wind is moving air, ranging from a light, gentle breeze to a very strong and fast-moving storm capable of great destruction. Air moves because the Sun warms some places more than the others, creating differences in air pressure, which causes the air to be pushed around in the form of air currents.

Differences in atmospheric pressure generate winds. At the Equator, the sun warms the water and land more than it does the rest of the globe. Warm equatorial air rises higher into the atmosphere and migrates toward the poles. This is a low-pressure system. At the same time, cooler, denser air moves over Earth’s surface toward the Equator to replace the heated air. This is a high-pressure system. Winds generally blow from high-pressure areas to low-pressure areas.Wind is the movement of air caused by the uneven heating of the Earth by the sun. It does not have much substance—you cannot see it or hold it—but you can feel its force. It can dry your clothes in summer and chill you to the bone in winter. It is strong enough to carry sailing ships across the ocean and rip huge trees from the ground. It is the great equalizer of the atmosphere, transporting heat, moisture, pollutants, and dust great distances around the globe. Landforms, processes, and impacts of wind are called Aeolian landforms, processes, and impacts.

The boundary between these two areas is called a front. The complex relationships between fronts cause different types of wind and weather patterns.

Credit: National Geographic Society

Picture Credit : Google 

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